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Two-Thirds Laws of Hungary

Elections 2010Posted by administrator Fri, April 23, 2010 14:48:13
A two-thirds majority is 258 MPs in Hungary's 386-seat parliament. After the election on the table of possible changes are laws governing elections, local governments, the media and the status of Hungarians living beyond the borders. Hungary's election-winner centre-right Fidesz party has indicated plans to change half a dozen key laws once in power.


The party's deputy leader Laszlo Kover said earlier this week that Fidesz wants to touch few of the laws that need a two thirds majority.

On the table are laws governing elections, local governments, the media and the status of Hungarians living beyond the borders.

Earlier remarks by Fidesz officials suggest they could also be changing laws on the immunity of members of parliament and consider a merger of the national security services.

One of the most controversial changes ahead is to the media law. Reports suggest that Fidesz plans to merge Hungary's public-service media and replace the entire media supervisory structure.

Economists say that reforming the bloated and costly system of local governments is a must if Hungary is to restore financial sustainability and economic competitiveness.

Two-Thirds Laws

A two-thirds majority is 258 MPs in Hungary's 386-seat parliament. It is needed to:

* change Hungary's constitution, including decisions on the coat of arms and flag of the Republic of Hungary, and issues concerning Hungary's European Union membership.
* elect the President of the Republic, the chief judge of the Constitutional Court, the president and vice-presidents of the State Audit Office, and ombudsmen.
* declare war
* order a closed meeting of parliament.
* make procedural and electoral law amendments. These include various laws on citizenship, referendums, assembly and strike laws as well as laws on freedom of speech and religion. Protection of personal data, party financing, minority laws, defence, policing, the secret services, and many laws affecting the judiciary also fall under this category. (Politics)

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